Galway, Aran Islands, and The Cliffs of Moher- Clayton Franzoni

6 Oct

This weekend we visited Galway, The Aran Islands and the Cliffs Of Moher. When we first arrived in Galway I was very intrigued by the small, stone walkways and tiny shops and restaurants. At first glance it is inevitable that Galway is a much different city than Dublin and it is more like how I pictured cities in Ireland. Although not much time was spent in Galway, it changed my view of Ireland, which was previously not as enthusiastic because of my opinion on Dublin. The Aran Islands were very interesting as well. The population of The Aran Islands is only about 1,200 people and they primarily speak Irish. These Islands are home to the Aran sweater which is known world wide because it is 100% wool and of very high quality wool. The Aran sweater was not only for comfort and warmth, but it provided an identity for different family names. The pattern knitted into the sweaters was different for each family and would provide an identity for the people of the Islands. The Islands attract many visitors especially over the summer months because of the very old forts, cottages, and churches across the Island. Only people who live on the Island are allowed to build houses there and usually only 2-3 houses go for sale every 10 years. The Cliffs of Moher were the final attraction of our weekend. The Cliffs are located in County Clare and the highest point rises 702 feet above sea level. There is a round stone tower built by Sir Cornelius O’Brien in 1835 and was meant to be a tourist attraction for old Victorian visitors to the Cliffs. People say “he was a man ahead of his time” and believed tourism was would benefit the economy and help the situation of poverty in that time period. The Cliffs of Moher appear in movies today such as Harry Potter and Leap Year. It is evident that the Aran Islands and the Cliffs of Moher are major tourist attractions that generate a lot of revenue for their economies.

Clayton FranzoniThe Cliffs of Moher

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